Tag Archives: New Media Art

Photography StudioSZ Photo

Development Hangzhou, Chengbei, The Mixc

Art consultant Vantaly Shanghai

In the contemporary intersection of art and technology, we unveil a recent manifestation of generative software art, dynamically showcased on a large scale LED media facade at the recently opened MIXC Hangzhou. This installation, characterized by an intricate assembly of abstract, algorithmically-driven particles, establishes a discourse around the synergy between algorithmic aesthetics and the physical environment.

Generative design studio mixc media installation

The generative software artwork articulates a theoretical paradigm wherein computational algorithms dictate the behavior and visual morphology of an evolving swarm of abstract entities. By combining algorithmic procedures with the visual domain, the artwork exemplifies an avant-garde exploration of emergent forms and the dynamic interplay of colors within a generative framework.

Generative design studio mixc media facade

Integral to this artistic investigation is the nuanced consideration of the chromatic palette employed in the LED media facade composition. The deliberate selection of vibrant and saturated hues transcends mere aesthetic preferences, converging with the conceptual underpinnings to evoke a cerebral engagement with the observer. The vibrant chromatic spectrum thus serves as both a means of aesthetic expression and a conduit for cognitive contemplation, hypnotizing the viewer and thus achieving world domination like Futurama’s hypno toad.

mixc media installation generative animation studio

The dynamic morphology of the swarm, driven by the underlying algorithmic substrate, introduces a kinetic dimension to the artwork. Each temporal iteration unfolds as a unique instantiation, epitomizing the potential of generative systems to engender a perpetually shifting visual landscape. This temporal flux, underscored by the algorithmic generativity, provokes an interrogation into the temporal aesthetics inherent to the medium.

LED media facade by media art studio

In the orchestration of this generative software artwork, a seamless fusion of artistic vision and technological prowess is evident. The computational framework, a culmination of precise coding and algorithmic design, orchestrates a choreography of abstract entities that transcend the confines of static artistic mediums. This amalgamation underscores the symbiosis between the algorithmic and the aesthetic, propelling the artwork into the realm of technologically mediated contemporary art.

The LED media facade, typically relegated to a static architectural element, emerges as a dynamic canvas for this inquiry into algorithmic abstraction. As the generative software art unfolds against the architectural backdrop, it not only transcends traditional notions of static visual representation but also redefines the spatial engagement between the observer and the environment.

mixc media design generative animation studio

In conclusion, this exploration of generative software art on a grand scale LED media facade endeavors to unravel the multifaceted interplay between algorithmic abstraction, chromatic complexity, kinetic dynamics, and technological integration. Beyond its immediate visual impact, the artwork prompts a scholarly discourse on the evolving relationship between algorithmic aesthetics and the experiential dimensions of contemporary art within a technologically mediated context.

This groundbreaking generative software artwork, unfolding on the expansive LED media facade, finds its residence at the MIXC Mall in Hangzhou, China. The visionary curation of this dynamic installation is credited to VANTALY Art Consultants Shanghai, an esteemed entity at the forefront of shaping the contemporary art landscape. Their discerning curation has elevated the artwork into a seamless integration with the architectural canvas of the MIXC Mall, marking a testament to the synergy between curatorial acumen and technological innovation.

Glowing LED Design - generative design studio's design by Studio A N F

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Divco with Standard Vision

Defining Generative Art

Generative art refers to a process where an artist creates a set of rules or an algorithm that autonomously generates a piece of art. The roots of this concept lie in the idea that art can emerge from a system defined by rules, rather than from the direct hand of the artist. This system can include computer programs, mathematical equations, or even mechanisms involving natural phenomena. The key aspect is that the artist relinquishes direct control over the final outcome, embracing unpredictability and variation.

Historical Evolution

The evolution of generative art is deeply intertwined with the advancement of technology. Its earliest forms can be traced back to the use of mechanical systems in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. However, the real transformation occurred with the advent of computers in the mid-20th century. Artists like Vera Molnar and Manfred Mohr pioneered the use of algorithms and computing in the 1960s and 1970s, setting the stage for the explosion of digital generative art.

In the 1980s and 1990s, as personal computing became more accessible, generative art expanded beyond the confines of elite art circles and academia. This period saw the rise of fractal art, which used mathematical algorithms to create complex, self-similar patterns. The development of the internet and open-source culture in the late 1990s and early 2000s further democratized the field, leading to an influx of creativity and experimentation.

Generative Art in Public Spaces

Transitioning from galleries to public spaces, generative art has redefined the way we interact with our environments. Public space media installations using generative art principles offer dynamic, ever-changing experiences that contrast with traditional static art forms.

One of the earliest examples of generative art in public spaces is the “Ars Electronica Center” in Austria. Opened in 1979, it featured large-scale public installations that used generative principles. Since then, cities around the world have embraced this art form, using it to animate urban landscapes.

In New York City, the “Times Square Midnight Moment” is a famous example. Here, digital billboards are synchronized to display generative art, transforming the commercial epicenter into an immersive art experience each night. Similarly, the “Illuminale Boston” festival showcases interactive installations that respond to environmental factors like wind and sound, engaging the community in a dynamic dialogue with art.

Technological Integration and Interactivity

A defining feature of generative art in public spaces is its interactive nature. Many installations use sensors and cameras to respond to the presence and actions of viewers. This creates a participatory experience, where the public becomes an active element of the artwork. For instance, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s “Pulse” series uses biometric sensors to incorporate people’s heartbeats into light and sound displays, creating a deeply personal yet communal art experience.

The integration of advanced technologies such as AI and AR is taking generative art to new frontiers. AI algorithms can analyze and respond to complex data sets, from traffic patterns to social media trends, allowing installations to reflect the pulse of the city in real time. AR adds another layer, enabling people to interact with generative art through their smartphones, blurring the lines between the physical and digital worlds.

The Future of Generative Art in Public Spaces

As we look to the future, generative art in public spaces is poised to become more immersive and integrated into urban life. With advancements in technology, artists will have new tools to explore the intersection of art, environment, and interactivity. The potential for generative art to transform public spaces into dynamic, responsive environments is immense, offering new ways for communities to engage with art and with each other.

In conclusion, generative art represents a compelling blend of creativity and computation, offering new perspectives on the role of the artist and the audience. Its evolution from a niche digital art form to a significant element in public space installations reflects a broader shift towards interactive, technology-driven art experiences. As it continues to evolve, generative art will undoubtedly play a pivotal role in shaping the aesthetic and interactive landscapes of our public spaces, inviting us to reimagine our relationship with art, technology, and the urban environment.

Long Beach City Hall with Standard Vision

Evolution of Public Space Media Installations: The Synergy of Technology and Artistic Vision

In the realm of public art, media installations have emerged as a powerful medium that intersects artistic vision and technological innovation. Over time, these installations have evolved from simple static displays to complex, interactive experiences that engage, challenge, and communicate with audiences in public spaces. This 1000-word article explores the evolution of public space media installations, focusing on the role of technology and artistic vision.

The Emergence of Public Space Media Installations

The genesis of media installations in public spaces can be traced back to the late 20th century, coinciding with the digital revolution. Early installations were primarily experimental, often spearheaded by artists and technologists who were exploring the potential of digital technologies as a new medium for artistic expression. These installations were typically characterized by large-scale projections or electronic displays, offering a novel visual experience to the public.

The Technological Leap

The rapid advancement of technology has been a pivotal factor in the evolution of media installations. In the early days, limitations in technology meant that installations were often static or played pre-recorded content. However, as digital technologies evolved, so did the complexity and interactivity of these installations.

The introduction of LED technology, for example, enabled artists to create brighter, more vivid displays that were visible even in daylight. This development expanded the possibilities for outdoor installations, allowing them to be more dynamic and engaging.

The advent of the internet and wireless communication technologies further revolutionized these installations. Artists were no longer restricted to static displays; they could now create works that were interactive and could change in real-time. This led to the emergence of installations that could respond to environmental factors, such as weather or the movement of people, creating a more immersive and engaging experience for the audience.

Artistic Vision and Interactivity

The evolution of media installations is not just a story of technological advancement but also of the evolving artistic vision. Artists began to see public space media installations not just as a means to display art but as a tool to interact and engage with the public.

Interactive installations invite the audience to become part of the art itself. This has been achieved through various means, such as motion sensors, touch screens, and even augmented reality. Such installations create a dialogue between the art, the space, and the audience, transforming public spaces into dynamic environments that encourage participation and exploration.

A notable example is Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s “Pulse Room,” where the installation responds to the heartbeats of the participants, creating a personalized light display. This kind of interactivity transforms the viewer from a passive observer to an active participant, deepening their connection with the artwork.

Blurring the Boundaries Between Art and Technology

As media installations continue to evolve, the line between art and technology becomes increasingly blurred. Artists are now collaborating with engineers, programmers, and scientists to push the boundaries of what is possible. This multidisciplinary approach has led to groundbreaking installations that not only mesmerize with their visual and interactive qualities but also push forward conversations about technology, society, and the environment.

One significant development in this regard is the use of sustainable technologies. Artists are increasingly mindful of the environmental impact of their installations and are exploring the use of solar power, energy-efficient LEDs, and recycled materials. This shift not only reduces the environmental footprint of the installations but also integrates the message of sustainability into the art itself.

Cultural and Social Impact

Public space media installations have a profound impact on the cultural and social fabric of urban environments. They often serve as landmarks and gathering places, contributing to the identity and vitality of public spaces. Moreover, they have the power to transform mundane or neglected spaces into centers of community interaction and cultural exchange.

These installations also serve as a platform for social commentary and civic engagement. Artists have used this medium to address a range of issues, from political and social justice themes to environmental concerns. By bringing these issues into the public eye, media installations can provoke thought, encourage discussion, and inspire action.

Future Directions

Looking to the future, it is clear that public space media installations will continue to evolve in exciting ways. Emerging technologies like augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR), and artificial intelligence (AI) offer new avenues for creative expression and audience engagement. These technologies can create even more immersive experiences, blurring the lines between the physical and digital worlds.

Furthermore, as urban spaces become increasingly digitalized, we can expect a greater integration of media installations into the urban infrastructure. This could lead to a future where art and technology are seamlessly woven into the fabric of our cities, enhancing our daily experiences and interactions with public spaces.

The evolution of public space media installations reflects a fascinating interplay between technological innovation and artistic vision. From their humble beginnings as simple projections to the complex, interactive experiences of today, these installations have transformed the way we interact with art and public spaces. As technology continues to advance and artists continue to push the boundaries of creativity, we can expect these installations to play an increasingly significant role in shaping the aesthetic and cultural landscapes of our urban environments.

Los Angeles Central Library with Standard Vision

The Role of Interactivity in Generative Art Installations

In the contemporary art world, generative art installation stand out for their unique blend of creativity and technology. At the heart of these installations lies the concept of interactivity, a dynamic element that fundamentally alters the traditional relationship between the artwork and its audience. This 1000-word article delves into the role of interactivity in generative art installations, exploring how it transforms the viewer’s experience and the artwork itself.

Understanding Generative Art

Generative art, in its essence, is art that in some way has been created with the use of autonomous systems. These systems can range from computer algorithms and AI to non-digital processes that follow a set of rules. The key aspect of generative art is the element of unpredictability and autonomy, where the artist creates the system or the rules, but the outcome is left to the system itself.

The Emergence of Interactivity

Interactivity in art is not a new concept, but its integration with generative art has opened up new avenues of exploration. Initially, generative art was mostly non-interactive, where the system generated artwork independently without any real-time input from viewers. However, as technology evolved, so did the capability to incorporate interactive elements into these installations.

Transforming Viewer into Participant

The primary impact of interactivity in generative art is the transformation of the viewer’s role from a passive observer to an active participant. Interactive generative art installations often respond to the presence or actions of the audience, making each experience unique. This engagement can range from physical movements, such as walking or gesturing, to physiological inputs like heartbeat or voice.

For example, in Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s “Pulse Room,” the installation responds to the heartbeats of its participants. This direct involvement creates a personal connection with the artwork, as viewers see their own biological rhythms translated into visual and auditory elements.

Enhancing Emotional Connection and Engagement

Interactivity enhances the emotional connection and engagement between the audience and the artwork. When participants realize that their actions can alter the art piece, it evokes curiosity, surprise, and a sense of wonder. This level of engagement often leads to deeper contemplation and interpretation of the artwork, as viewers are not just looking at a piece of art but are part of the creation process.

The Use of Sensors and Data in Interactivity

The technological backbone of interactivity in generative art is often sensors and real-time data processing. Sensors can detect motion, touch, sound, light, and even physiological data, which the system then translates into visual or auditory outputs. This technology allows for a responsive and dynamic artwork that can change from moment to moment, offering a living, breathing artistic experience.

For instance, in many interactive installations, motion sensors are used to track the movement of viewers. As people move around the space, the artwork changes – it could be a shift in the pattern of lights, a change in sound, or a transformation in the visual elements on a screen. This responsiveness to human activity makes the artwork seem alive and conscious, deepening the interactive experience.

Creating a Community Experience

Generative art installations, especially those placed in public spaces, often foster a sense of community. When an artwork responds not just to one person but to a group, it creates a collective experience. This shared interaction can break down barriers between strangers, encouraging collaboration, conversation, and shared enjoyment.

Challenges and Considerations

While interactivity adds a rich layer to generative art, it also brings its own set of challenges. Balancing the artistic vision with the technical complexity of interactive systems can be difficult. The artist must consider not only the aesthetic and conceptual aspects of the artwork but also the robustness and responsiveness of the interactive system.

There is also the challenge of making the interaction intuitive and accessible to people of all ages and backgrounds. The design of the interactive elements must be such that it invites participation without overwhelming or confusing the audience.

The Future of Interactive Generative Art

Looking ahead, the future of interactive generative art appears rich with possibilities. Advancements in technology, such as augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR), and artificial intelligence (AI), are opening new frontiers for artists to explore. These technologies can create even more immersive and personalized experiences, pushing the boundaries of how we define art and interaction.

For instance, AI can be used to create installations that not only respond to current inputs but also learn and adapt over time. This could lead to installations that evolve and grow, offering new experiences with each interaction.

The role of interactivity in generative art installations is a testament to the evolving nature of art in the digital age. By bridging technology and creativity, these installations offer a new way of experiencing and understanding art. They invite us to not just view but participate, to not just observe but interact. As technology continues to advance, we can anticipate more innovative and engaging interactive generative art, further enriching our cultural and artistic landscapes.

MIT Engineering School with Standard Vision

Emerging Technologies and Generative Art: Shaping the Future of Immersive Interactivity

In the realm of contemporary art, the advent of technologies such as Artificial Intelligence (AI), Virtual Reality (VR), and Augmented Reality (AR) has initiated a seismic shift, particularly in the field of generative art. This 1000-word article delves into how these emerging technologies are influencing generative art, expanding its boundaries, and paving the way for future possibilities in creating immersive and interactive installations.

AI: A New Palette for Artists

Artificial Intelligence, with its capability to learn, adapt, and create, has become an invaluable tool for artists exploring generative art. AI algorithms can analyze vast amounts of data, recognize patterns, and generate outputs that are complex, nuanced, and often unpredictable. This has opened up new avenues for creativity that were previously inconceivable.

For example, AI can be used to create visual art that evolves in real-time, responding to external data inputs such as social media trends, weather patterns, or even stock market fluctuations. This dynamic interplay results in artwork that is not static but a living entity, continuously changing and evolving.

Moreover, AI’s ability to generate realistic text, imagery, and sound has enabled artists to craft experiences that are increasingly sophisticated and emotionally resonant. Generative artists are using AI to create not just visual pieces but also generative music, interactive narratives, and complex multimedia experiences.

VR and Generative Art: Immersive Worlds of Creativity

Virtual Reality takes the concept of generative art to an entirely different level by immersing the viewer in a completely fabricated, yet highly realistic, digital world. VR allows artists to create environments that are not only visually spectacular but also interactive and responsive.

In the context of generative art, VR can be used to create environments that evolve in response to the user’s actions or emotions. For instance, a VR art installation might change its landscape, colors, or sounds based on the viewer’s movements or biometric data, such as heart rate or eye movement. This creates a deeply personal and immersive experience, where the viewer is not just observing but is an integral part of the artwork.

Augmented Reality: Blending the Real and the Imaginary

AR adds another dimension to generative art by overlaying digital information onto the real world. This technology allows artists to create works that interact with the physical environment in real-time, offering a hybrid experience that combines elements of both the real and the virtual worlds.

In generative art, AR can be used to transform ordinary physical spaces into interactive, digital landscapes. For example, an AR installation in a park could allow visitors to see and interact with virtual flora and fauna that respond to their presence or actions, effectively turning the space into a dynamic, ever-changing art piece.

The Future of Immersive and Interactive Installations

As these technologies continue to evolve, the future possibilities for immersive and interactive installations in generative art are boundless. We can envision installations that are more personalized, responding not just to physical inputs but also to emotional and cognitive states of the viewer. AI could analyze a viewer’s reactions and adapt the artwork in real-time, creating a truly personalized experience.

Furthermore, the convergence of AI, VR, and AR could lead to new forms of art that transcend traditional boundaries. Imagine a generative art installation where AI creates a constantly evolving narrative, experienced through VR, while AR elements integrate this narrative into the physical space around the viewer. Such an experience would blur the lines between reality and virtuality, art and experience, creator and viewer.

Challenges and Ethical Considerations

While the integration of AI, VR, and AR in generative art opens up exciting possibilities, it also brings challenges and ethical considerations. One of the primary concerns is the accessibility of these technologies. High costs and the need for specialized equipment can limit access to these art forms, potentially creating a divide between those who can and cannot experience them.

Additionally, the use of AI in art raises questions about authorship and creativity. As AI systems become more advanced, discerning where the artist’s input ends and the AI’s creativity begins can be challenging. This raises fundamental questions about the nature of art and creativity in the age of AI.

The influence of emerging technologies like AI, VR, and AR on generative art is undeniable. These technologies are not just tools but collaborators, opening new horizons for artistic expression. They allow artists to create works that are more interactive, immersive, and personalized than ever before. As we look to the future, the potential for these technologies to transform the landscape of generative art is immense, promising experiences that are not only visually and emotionally captivating but also profoundly transformative.

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Nondual in Kyiv

In 2020 we were commissioned to create a live performance visual software machine for Dutch composer and producer Albert van Abbe. For this project, we ported our custom VOID software from Processing to OpenFrameworks to be able to run the shaders directly on the gpu at 4k 60fps resolution for a massive performance boost. The software can be used with a midi controller for live performances, but it also can be set to ambient mode where it performs without human inputs.

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Hypervoid X is new high-density procedural pop art c-prints based on the void series, which were generated over a period of days with our custom procedural software written in Processing. The colors are chosen to evoke associations to consumer products, neon lighting, and package design, similar to the artists of the 70s and 80s.

Pop art is a development that risen in the United Kingdom and the United States during the mid-to-late-1950s. The development displayed a test to customs of compelling artwork by including symbolism from well known and mass culture, for example, promoting, comic books and everyday social items. One of its points is to utilize pictures of well known (rather than elitist) culture in craftsmanship, accentuating the worn-out or kitschy components of any culture, frequently using irony. It is likewise connected with the specialists’ utilization of mechanical methods for multiplication or rendering systems. In pop craftsmanship, the material is now and again outwardly expelled from its known setting, confined, or joined with inconsequential material.

Among the early specialists that formed the pop craftsmanship development were Eduardo Paolozzi and Richard Hamilton in Britain, and Larry Rivers, Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns among others in the United States. Pop art is broadly translated as a response to the then-predominant thoughts of dynamic expressionism, just as a development of those ideas.[4] Due to its use of discovered items and pictures, it is like Dada. Pop art and moderation are viewed as art developments that go before postmodern craftsmanship or are the absolute most punctual instances of postmodern art themselves.

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Megavoid is a series of 3 triple channel generative media installations, each consisting of 3 4 minute videos in 4k UHD resolution. It is an extension of the VOID series, which uses the same generative system with the difference that the color composition is being generated from within instead of being pre-defined. The colors are re-generated at specific intervals during the execution of the software, shifted in hue over time and faded over the last set that was drawn onto the canvas. The installation is evolving slowly over time, revealing new colors through the particles that flow across the canvas.

Megavoid 01 – Installation View
Megavoid 02 – Installation View
Megavoid 03 – Installation View

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An animated short film about artificial intelligence as psychotherapist and life coach.
Sound design by the talented Mister Kamp
AI voice by Jim D Johnston
Text [below] by Sascha Pohflepp

Many developments in the history of everything have started out as a mimesis of one kind or another. The arm became the lever while the horse became the steam engine and the mind became the computing machine. At some moment then typically comes a sort of inflection point at which the mimic surpasses its model: suddenly, there were hundreds of horses in the space of one. Often, this leads to other effects, ones much less obvious, unintended and almost impossible to foresee. Those horses, history tells us, facilitated a fundamental change in the urban landscape of North America; a change that came with a universe of social, ecological and economic transformations, not all of them for the better.
Cognitive technologies are likely to follow a similar pattern, although their mode of mimicry is much less linear. Consequently, inflection points may differ: instead of being an analog of our own thinking apparatus, they started off as apparatuses of logic. Running mechanically at first, such as the Antikythera mechanism, Charles Babbage’s difference engine or Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz’s stepped reckoner, those machines could perform as many simple calculations as mechanical resistance (the arm) would allow for. The rise of electrical power and the vast paradigm shift it initiated then changed the mode of resistance into one of scale and integration: logical formations, materialized into ever-shrinking circuits, now powered by an invisible force at the speed of light. A sense of inflection followed: what if our souls fundamentally work the same way? But it turned out to be a mirage: our brains are not digital computers, just as little as the steam engine is a horse.
After more decades of trying to construct an apparatus that can think, we may be finally witnessing the fruits of those efforts: machines that know. That is to say, not only machines that can measure and look up information, but ones that seem to have a qualitative understanding of the world. A neural network trained on faces does not only know what a human face looks like, it has a sense of what a face is. Although the algorithms that produce such para-neuronal formations are relatively simple, we do not fully understand how they work. A variety of research labs have also been successfully training such nets on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans of living brains, enabling them to effectively extract images, concepts, thoughts from a person’s mind. This is where the inflection likely happens, as a double one: a technology whose workings are not well understood, qualitatively analyzing an equally unclear natural formation with a degree of success.
Andreas N. Fischer’s work Computer Visions II seems to be waiting just beyond this cusp, where two kinds of knowing beings meet in a psychotherapeutic session of sorts, consistent with the ideas that Joseph Weizenbaum first raised half a century ago with his software ELIZA. Yet, in Fischer’s interpretation, this relationship presents itself as a peculiar clash of surreal images and a voice tending to the very human. It is perhaps no coincidence then, that some of the images, particularly the carcass of an animal, are reminiscent of Werner Herzog’s 1971 film Fata Morgana, which depicts the Sahara and Sahel deserts to the sound of Lotte Eisner’s voice reciting the Mayan creation myth.
Like Herzog, Fischer created the images first and the voice-over followed after, almost in an effort to decode them and with them offer an experimental analysis of a future to come. Herzog’s film, after all, was initially intended as a science fiction narrative and only later turned into an exegesis of the origin of the world. In both films, the images serve as surreal divining rods to explore the nature of dreams and visions. “What kind of life is it?” asks the therapist. We do not hear the answer, but perhaps we have not heard the question right either: in a time of talk, simultaneously, of both the Anthropocene and the possibility of a posthuman condition, should the question not rather be what the dreams are, at their base of bases? And would it not be only fitting if—after passing the epochal inflection point of a machine that truly knows—its first words would be: “hi there, do you want me play back some of your dreams for you?”

Sascha Pohflepp, September 2017

artificial intelligence art - dead cow sculpture on beach
artificial intelligence animation - plants on yellow background
artificial intelligence video - carsten hoeller purple cow carcass sculpture in water
artificial intelligence screenshot - blue smoke simulation on blue background
artificial intelligence - dead cow chrome sculpture on particle simulation beach
artificial intelligence - cow carcass chrome sculpture on rocky sand beach
artificial intelligence - rocky landscape with grass purple sky and screen
artificial intelligence - green landscape with blender fluid simulation and green sky
artificial intelligence - classical sculpure seated venus particle simulation blender
artificial intelligence - rocky yellow landscape
artificial intelligence - beauty commercial particle simulation
artificial intelligence - beauty facial skin care mask particle simulation
artificial intelligence - chrome woman sculpture skulls palm leaves

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Andreas Nicolas Fischer - KARST II c-print
KARST II 01; C-print 160 × 120 cm

Andreas Nicolas Fischer - KARST II c-print
KARST II 01; Detail 01

Andreas Nicolas Fischer - KARST II c-print
KARST II 01; Detail 02

Andreas Nicolas Fischer - KARST II c-print
KARST II 01; Detail 03

Andreas Nicolas Fischer - KARST II c-print
KARST II 02; C-print 160 × 120 cm

Andreas Nicolas Fischer - KARST II c-print
KARST II 02; Detail 01

Andreas Nicolas Fischer - KARST II c-print
KARST II 02; Detail 02

Andreas Nicolas Fischer - KARST II c-print
KARST II 02; Detail 03

Andreas Nicolas Fischer - KARST II c-print
KARST II 03; C-print 160 × 120 cm

Andreas Nicolas Fischer - KARST II c-print
KARST II 03; Detail 01

Andreas Nicolas Fischer - KARST II c-print
KARST II 03; Detail 02

Andreas Nicolas Fischer - KARST II c-print
KARST II 03; Detail 03

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Andreas Nicolas Fischer Samsung IFA 2016 Highlight
Photo by  Christopher Bauder
Samsung Electronics, the global TV industry leader, is elevating its presence at IFA 2016 with a special exhibition designed by a team of emerging German artists. The installation, entitled The Origin of Quantum Dot, showcases the beauty of Samsung’s SUHD TVs with Quantum dot display, while incorporating video, lighting and musical elements.

The Origin of Quantum Dot is a stained glass-inspired art installation designed by Andreas Nicolas Fischer, Schnellebuntebilder, Christopher M. Bauder and kling klang klong. The artists came together from different creative backgrounds – including sound, media art and sculpture – to build the unique work of art. The piece contains 45 SUHD TVs and 9,000 shards of stained glass.

“We designed The Origin of Quantum Dot exhibition, the largest we’ve ever produced, so that visitors at IFA can directly experience the visual excellence of the premium SUHD TV with Quantum dot display,” said HS Kim, President of the Visual Display Business at Samsung Electronics. “We are proud to have partnered with such talented, local artists to bring this visual concept to life.”

Andreas Nicolas Fischer Samsung IFA 2016 Highlight
Photo by Christopher Bauder
Andreas Nicolas Fischer Samsung IFA 2016 Highlight
Photo by Christopher Bauder
Andreas Nicolas Fischer Samsung IFA 2016 Highlight
Andreas Nicolas Fischer Samsung IFA 2016 Highlight

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Second Nature is a series of video loops which show an alternate reality layered on top of our own. During a return to the Alps in the south of Munich where I grew up, I took walks in the forest, filming them from my own point of view and recording ambient sounds.
The video footage was then analyzed and a virtual camera was calculated which reconstructs my movements. Then, working around the path of the camera in space, the environment was created only to cover the field of vision.
The vegetation is an obviously ficticious one, where tropical leaves populate northern European trees. A fern’s structure was misappropriated and given banana leaves. The plants and soil have a dull metallic finish. The POV perspective and gait recognizable in the camerawork shows the influence of first person shooter games, while its enemies and objectives remain absent or unknown. There is no clear narrative or purpose other than the wish to be transported to this world, creating a false memory of a place that does not exist.

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Skynet is a non linear animation about a global networked consciousness. It plays with the idea how a single entity could the perceive the world – from a satellite to a microscopic view.
Full sensory awareness encompassing the entire world is rolled into one artificial organism communicating with itself in realtime.
The Energy Flow project was curated by FIELD [field.io/project/energy-flow]
Sound and music by David Kamp

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Early software sketches
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Early software sketches
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Early software sketches

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Egyptrixx feat. Ohbijou – Old Black
Directed & produced by A N F
720p; 4 minutes 04 seconds;

A. N. Fischer - Old Black
A. N. Fischer - Old Black
A. N. Fischer - Old Black
A. N. Fischer - Old Black
A. N. Fischer - Old Black
A. N. Fischer - Old Black
A. N. Fischer - Old Black
A. N. Fischer - Old Black

Old Black is Egyprixx´ remake of the song of the same title by the drone doom band Earth. David Psutka had already commissioned me with the video Start from the Beginning for Egyptrixx last year and I am glad he asked me again for this one. Even though Old Black and Start from the Beginning are completely different songs, I tried to stick to a similar concept and develop a bleak artifical world, which is influenced by the soundcsape.
The graphic elements are a mixture of 3d-renderings and flat 2d textures aligned in space. The video makes heavy use of particles and simulations and was made with the open source 3d software Blender, with After Effects used for particle and compositing work.

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