Tag Archives: processing.org

digital canvas art generative software art
Supervoid 01 R131_N131_108010

This generative artwork by Andreas Nicolas Fischer is an ethereal display of fluidity and color. A digital canvas comes alive with flowing forms and hues that seem to dance across the surface in a choreographed spectacle of digital brushwork. Each stroke melds seamlessly into the next, creating a complex network of intertwining lines and shapes.

The palette is a vivid spectrum of color ranging from deep, velvety blacks and earthy browns to bright yellows, electric blues, and passionate reds. These colors swirl together in a natural yet surreal pattern, reminiscent of geological strata or the psychedelic swirls of a retro lava lamp. The soft gradients and transitions between the colors are smooth and give the impression of a continuous, dynamic fluid motion.

This artwork suggests a process of perpetual transformation, much like the constant change seen in nature’s own designs—cloud formations, the flow of water, or the shifting sands of a dune. There’s a semblance of topography, as if we’re looking at a satellite view of a vibrant, otherworldly landscape, where the normal rules of physics and geography do not apply.

Fischer’s technique possibly involves a complex algorithmic process where mathematical rules translate into visual output, resulting in patterns that evoke the natural world while being entirely digital. His method likely includes a form of randomness, contributing to the uniqueness of each piece within the series. The result is a striking balance between chaos and order, planning and spontaneity, human intention and computer interpretation.

The lines in the artwork have a certain fluidity that suggests movement. They flow like rivers of color, meandering through different emotional landscapes. The denser areas where the dark colors pool could represent deeper thoughts or feelings, while the brighter, more vibrant areas might symbolize moments of clarity or joy.

In some places, the lines converge into points of intense color, as if we’re witnessing the birth of stars in a nebula, or the focal point of an artistic explosion. The brushstrokes have a tactile quality; one can almost feel the thickness of the paint, the drag of the brush, despite knowing that this texture is a digital construct.

The viewing experience is immersive. As the eye travels across the canvas, new forms and transitions reveal themselves. It’s easy to get lost in contemplation, each observer likely to interpret the tangle of colors and shapes in a personal way. Fischer’s work challenges the viewer to reconsider the boundaries between the digital and the organic, the planned and the random, the created and the naturally occurring.

Overall, the piece is a testament to Fischer’s mastery of digital tools to emulate the complexities and beauty of the natural world. It encourages a contemplation of the essence of art in the age of technology: the role of the artist when creation involves code as much as it does creativity, the place of human emotion in the midst of calculated algorithms, and the profound beauty that emerges from the fusion of these realms.

Supervoid One digital canvas art generative art software
Supervoid 01 R138_N138_192017

This second piece of generative artwork by Andreas Nicolas Fischer, which is from the same series as “Supervoid One,” is a vibrant and dynamic digital creation. The image is characterized by a mesmerizing flow of colors with a sense of depth and fluidity that seems to be in constant motion. Rich magentas, deep blacks, and a spectrum of greens and blues coalesce into ribbon-like formations, giving the impression of a digitized version of marbled paper or the swirling patterns of a kaleidoscope.

The organic, wave-like structures suggest a topographical map of a fantastical landscape or the churning surface of a colorful sea. The layering of colors and the way they blend into each other give the piece a three-dimensional quality, as if one could dive into the swirls and eddies. The variation in color density and the interplay between light and dark areas create a rhythm within the piece, almost like visual music.

Like other works by Fischer, this piece may explore the relationship between natural forms and digital processes, showcasing how algorithmic methods can emulate and amplify patterns found in nature. The artwork is a testament to the power of generative art to create complex and evocative visual experiences that can evoke emotional responses similar to those elicited by the natural world.

Supervoid generative art software
Supervoid 01 R317_N880_552000

The artwork titled “Supervoid One R317_N880_552000” by Andreas Nicolas Fischer (Studio ANF) presents a captivating and fluid composition that resembles the organic movement of viscous fluids or the colorful interplay of light through a prism. Dominated by hues of purple and green, the piece creates a dynamic sense of movement through digital brushstrokes that swirl and twist around each other. The colors graduate smoothly from one to another, with pockets of more intense saturation that draw the eye. This digital piece could be a reflection of natural phenomena, an abstract representation of space and depth, or an exploration of color dynamics in a digital medium.

It is a fine example of Fischer’s style, which often utilizes digital algorithms and data to produce visually stunning pieces that blur the line between the digital and the natural world. The smooth, almost silky texture suggests a depth that invites the viewer to look deeper, hinting at the void or space referenced in the title. The artwork is distinctly modern, harnessing technology to create an aesthetic experience that could not be achieved with traditional media.

Hypervoid X is new high-density procedural pop art c-prints based on the void series, which were generated over a period of days with our custom procedural software written in Processing. The colors are chosen to evoke associations to consumer products, neon lighting, and package design, similar to the artists of the 70s and 80s.

Pop art is a development that risen in the United Kingdom and the United States during the mid-to-late-1950s. The development displayed a test to customs of compelling artwork by including symbolism from well known and mass culture, for example, promoting, comic books and everyday social items. One of its points is to utilize pictures of well known (rather than elitist) culture in craftsmanship, accentuating the worn-out or kitschy components of any culture, frequently using irony. It is likewise connected with the specialists’ utilization of mechanical methods for multiplication or rendering systems. In pop craftsmanship, the material is now and again outwardly expelled from its known setting, confined, or joined with inconsequential material.

Among the early specialists that formed the pop craftsmanship development were Eduardo Paolozzi and Richard Hamilton in Britain, and Larry Rivers, Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns among others in the United States. Pop art is broadly translated as a response to the then-predominant thoughts of dynamic expressionism, just as a development of those ideas.[4] Due to its use of discovered items and pictures, it is like Dada. Pop art and moderation are viewed as art developments that go before postmodern craftsmanship or are the absolute most punctual instances of postmodern art themselves.

Generative Software Process; 2012; Dimensions variable; Excerpt of 1:25

The software uses a swarm of particles to gradually create an abstract composition based on the color and composition of a series of photographs. The drawing agents behave according to a set of rules, but have a degree of autonomy.
When the software is being run it produces an infinite sequence of unique images over time.

Schwarm software
Installation View at Rua Red Dublin

generative art exhibition at GIM Bremen
KM 223455 and KM 215018
KM-215018 – procedural drawing
KM 215018 – Procedural drawing; 40 × 30 cm; C-print
software drawing machine – procedural drawing
KM 223455 – Procedural drawing; 40 × 30 cm; C-print
generative art exhibition at GIM Bremen
KM 225510 and KM 235130
design studio berlin – procedural drawing
KM 225510 – Procedural drawing; 40 × 30 cm; C-print
procedural drawing
KM 235130 – Procedural drawing; 40 × 30 cm; C-print